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Lord, Teach Us To Pray: A Series on the Lord's Prayer (Ordinary Time / Fall 2019)

The season of Ordinary Time is the longest season of the church year, spanning all the way from Pentecost to Advent. At Community CRC, we usually structure Ordinary Time in two parts, the summer and the fall. In the fall, we do a series based on the Heidelberg Catechism.


This year, our focus is on prayer, and where better to turn than the Lord’s Prayer? In the gospels, Jesus’ disciples ask him many questions, and most of the questions they ask are the wrong questions, so Jesus doesn’t really answer them. But when the disciples ask: “Lord, teach us to pray,” Jesus jumps right in.


The Lord’s Prayer has been repeated by Christians since the days of Jesus’ ministry. And from the beginning, Christian pastors and theologians recognized that the Lord’s Prayer isn’t just one prayer among many. Rather, the Lord’s Prayer is the heart of Christian prayer. It teaches us how to pray, the Lord’s Prayer draws us near to God, and the Lord’s Prayer reveals the heart of Jesus to us in a unique and intimate way.


One of the biggest themes that the Lord’s Prayer itself emphasizes is the theme of dependence on God. This is one of the most counter-cultural teachings of scripture in our society. In Western society, we tend to emphasize independence, personal choice, individualism, and self-expression as the highest values in our lives. That’s just the way our culture forms and shapes us. (Which is ironic, eh? Do you remember making a “personal choice” to make “personal choice” the highest value in your life? Just goes to show the formative soul-shaping power of culture!). But scripture constantly reminds us that there is no such thing as independence, no such thing as truly free personal choice. We are always dependent on others. We are always formed and shaped by forces that are bigger than we are. It’s just a question of whether that “greater force” that forms and shapes us is God or someone or something else!


The Heidelberg Catechism concludes its teaching with questions and answers on prayer. It is the second part of the “Gratitude” section, framing prayer as “the most important part of the thankfulness God requires of us.” Prayer is the most important way that we say “thank you” to God for everything God has done for us in Christ!


September 22, 2019

Why Pray?

Pastor: John Medendorp Series: Lord, Teach Us To Pray: A Series on the Lord's Prayer (Ordinary Time / Fall 2019) Topic: Prayer Passage: Luke 11:1–11:13

February 17, 2019

Whatever You Do

Pastor: John Medendorp Series: God's Love, Our Love (Epiphany) Topic: Work Passage: Colossians 3:1–3:17

February 10, 2019

A Living Sacrifice

Pastor: Amanda Bakale Series: God's Love, Our Love (Epiphany) Topic: Sacrifice Passage: Romans 12:1–12:21

February 3, 2019

God at Work

Pastor: Amanda Bakale Series: Judges Passage: Judges 4:1–4:23

February 3, 2019

A Gospel of Abundance

Pastor: John Medendorp Series: God's Love, Our Love (Epiphany) Passage: Micah 4:1–4:5

January 27, 2019

Stewards of God’s Gifts

Pastor: Carel Geleynse Series: God's Love, Our Love (Epiphany) Topic: Stewardship Passage: Matthew 25:14–25:30

January 20, 2019

A Beautiful Little Planet

Pastor: Amanda Bakale Series: God's Love, Our Love (Epiphany) Topic: Stewardship, Creation Passage: Genesis 1:26–1:31

January 20, 2019

In the World

Pastor: John Medendorp Series: Judges Topic: World Passage: Judges 3:1–3:31

January 13, 2019

Jesus's Mission through a Meal

Series: God's Love, Our Love (Epiphany) Topic: Missions Passage: John 20:19–20:23, Luke 14:15–14:24

January 6, 2019

From Generation to Generation

Pastor: Amanda Bakale Series: Judges Topic: Generations Passage: Judges 2:6–2:23

January 6, 2019

We Love Because He First Loved Us!

Pastor: Carel Geleynse Series: God's Love, Our Love (Epiphany) Topic: Love, Discipleship Passage: 1 John 4:7–4:21

Old Testament